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economy of monastic life, (as it existed in England) a poem, with philosophical, and archæological illustrations from Lyndwood, Dugdale, Selden, Wilkins, Willis, Spelman, Warton, &c. and copious extracts from original mss by Thomas Dudley Fosbroke

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Published by Printed by R. Raikes. And sold by R. Faulder ... Messrs. Fletcher and Hanwell, Oxford: Hough, Glocester; & c in Glocester .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Monasticism and religious orders -- England

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBy T.D. Fosbrooke.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR4705.F57
The Physical Object
Pagination120 p. ;
Number of Pages120
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19529518M
LC Control Number25006310

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The economy of monastic life, (as it existed in England): a poem, with philosophical, and archæological illustrations from Lyndwood, Dugdale, Selden, Wilkins, Willis, Spelman, Warton, &c. and copious extracts from original mss. Monastic gastronomy and, usually organic, food products have become a base for a special culture for a modern, sobre and frugal style of being and welfare. The sharing economy and collaborative consumption seem to be an amazing application of monastic style in . This book presents a well-documented, interesting, and enjoyable summary of the Christian monastic way of life and also describes the personal journey of a young Baptist-turned-Anglican minister seeking God's face through contemplative prayer and by following Christ's footsteps back to the apostolic : “The monk's ultimate goal is direct union with the Godhead. But to aim at that goal is to miss it altogether. His task is to rid himself of ego so that consciousness, once its usual discordant mental content is dumped out of it through ritual prayer and meditation, may experience nonself as a living formlessness and emptiness into which God may come, if it please Him to come.”.

Books shelved as monastic-life: The Cloister Walk by Kathleen Norris, The Rule of Saint Benedict by Benedict of Nursia, Finding the Monk Within: Great Mo. This item: The Age of the Cloister: The Story of Monastic Life in the Middle Ages by Christopher Brooke Paperback $ Only 20 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Monasteries And Monastic Orders: Years of Christian Art and Culture by Rolf Toman Hardcover $Reviews:   The Monastery Rules discusses the position of the monasteries in pres Tibetan Buddhist societies and how that position was informed by the far-reaching relationship of monastic Buddhism with Tibetan society, economy, law, and culture. Jansen focuses her study on monastic guidelines, or bca’ yig. The first study of its kind to examine the genre in detail, the book contains an exploration of its parallels in other Buddhist cultures Reviews: 1. 3. Monasticism also neglected the economic life of the people. Monastic education was chiefly religious in character. It neglected other aspects of education, particularly the vocational aspect. 4. Forceful and artificial suppression of human desires led to maladjustment and other forms of abnormal behaviour.

This item: The World of Medieval Monasticism: Its History and Forms of Life (Cistercian Studies) by Gert Melville Paperback $ Only 7 left in stock (more on Reviews: 2. Get this from a library! The economy of monastic life: (as it existed in England) a poem, with philosophical, and archæological illustrations from Lyndwood, Dugdale, Selden, Wilkins, Willis, Spelman, Warton, &c. and Copious Extracts from Original Mss. By T.D. Fosbrooke, M.A. Curate of Horsley, Glocestershire.. [Thomas Dudley Fosbroke]. Some men adapt to monastic life easily, others less so. There is a great need to spend some time in unhurried and un-pressured contemplation of whether or not monastic life in general, and monastic life at a certain monastery in particular, is suitable for any given candidate. Thus, there is built into the structure of monastic life the various. Monastic life appealed to many in the Middle Ages, and as the number and wealth of monasteries increased, so did demand for buildings, books, and devotional objects. Medieval monastic communities shaped the development of the arts by their patronage but also by their creativity and inventiveness, as innovations tried in one monastery often spread to other houses and into more .